Skip to Content

Sharing the Success of the Digital Economy, new report

17 May, 2015
By Allison Orr

A new report, Sharing the Success of the Digital Economy, is a collaboration between the UK Policy Network and the Information Technology and Innovation Foundation (ITIF).

It is a series of essays that looks at how our digitally enabled economy can be harnessed to support rising living standards.

Following on from our article on concerns over the effects of digital disruption on the workforce, this report argues that “creative destruction stemming from technological innovation is a fundamentally positive force”.  That innovations, in the form of better machines, improved medicines, new ways of communicating and even new technology-enabled business models like Uber, “are progressive in nature, leading to a better life for most people.”

The final essay specifically looks to the future and the impact all this change may have on our political system.   “The Political Opportunity of the Digital Age”, by Michael McTiernan and Alistair Reed, argues that the digitally-enabled economy will unleash changes with new jobs and industries rising alongside insecure employment. Professions that once offered secure employment and middle-income wages, such as teaching, engineers, accountants, are seeing their wages shrink and their jobs exposed to technological change and global competition.  There is now a growing concern with inequality, and a fear that jobs and skills will become surplus to requirements.

The final essay specifically looks to the future and the impact all this change may have on our political system.   “The Political Opportunity of the Digital Age”, by Michael McTiernan and Alistair Reed, argues that the digitally-enabled economy will unleash changes with new jobs and industries rising alongside insecure employment. Professions that once offered secure employment and middle-income wages, such as teaching, engineers, accountants, are seeing their wages shrink and their jobs exposed to technological change and global competition.  There is now a growing concern with inequality, and a fear that jobs and skills will become surplus to requirements.

Previously published in undefined.

More Articles