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Change.org launches version 2.0 for political action

30 May, 2007
By Allison Orr

Change.Org was launched in February this year and aims to transform the way people engage with social issues around the world.  The website acts as an information and ideas exchange for social activism and facilitates the building of networks of activists around already existing grassroots organisations.  This enables activists all over the world to get involved in issues they can’t in the “real world” by posting ideas, engaging in dialogue and organising events via the Change.Org website, and augments the activities of grassroots organisations.  The issues, or “changes”, discussed on the site are diverse, some examples include: end global poverty, empower women, support public transport, decrease taxation, allow gay marriage, cure malaria.  Each of these changes is a section for members to post pictures, videos, blogs and find ways to get involved with grassroots organisations.

This week, Change.org launched version 2.0 of their website which expands the site from basic social activism into political campaigning and fundraising.  The new section builds on the capacity for members to locate like-minded grassroots organisations, and now will also locate politicians that are willing to support a particular cause.  One the new features is “Click to Call” – which allows you to contact a politician's office and tell them why you support a specific cause.   The new site also has a big fundraising aspect, with members now able to donate money to organisations and political campaigns through the website.

The site lists the politicians who have signed on, and currently includes most of the Democrats presidential candidates.  Candidate Ron Paul is currently the only Republican politician on the site.  Each politician on the site has their own page, listing the members who support them, videos, blogs, pictures, and endorsements.  

“Our goal is to give average citizens the sorts of tools that have currently been exclusively at the use of large national organizations, making it easy for them to translate their passion for an issue into real political power," says Ben Rattray, founder and CEO of Change.org in their media release.  “We want to empower people to advance change through all means available."

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